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Cloud cover helps slow Idaho wildfire growth

HAILEY, Idaho - Fire managers are expressing optimism in their battle against a wildfire that has scorched nearly 160 square miles and forced the evacuation of 2,300 homes near two central Idaho resort communities.

Officials said Sunday the fire near Ketchum and Sun Valley grew only about 12 square miles because of cloud cover the day before and the arrival of additional firefighters.

More than 1,200 people are now assigned to the Beaver Creek Fire, which is 9 percent contained.

Fire managers say both of the nation's DC-10 jet retardant bombers have been used, but one experienced an engine malfunction after a drop Thursday. The jet made it back safely to Pocatello in southeastern Idaho but remains unavailable.

Fire spokeswoman Shawna Hartman says nearly 90 fire engines are in the region, many protecting structures.

More people were forced from their homes outside the posh central Idaho ski town of Ketchum as a wildfire stoked by strong winds made a push to the north.

The number of residences evacuated by the blaze rose to more than 2,300 by Saturday evening. But despite the adverse conditions and extreme fire behavior, some progress was made on the Beaver Creek Fire's south end, where crews conducted mop-up along the borders of blackened foothills west of the Hailey.

Lightning ignited the blaze Aug. 7. Fire officials estimated it grew to 144 square miles Friday night, fed by dry timber and underbrush. But they expect a more accurate size assessment after a plane with infrared cameras flies over the burn Saturday night.

More than 700 firefighters have been deployed to the mountains west of this affluent region, where celebrities like Arnold Schwarzenegger, Tom Hanks and Bruce Willis own pricey getaways. Five more hotshot crews arrived Saturday, and more are expected to arrive this weekend to continue focusing on protecting homes in a sparsely populated county.

"It was a good day from the standpoint that we had no injuries, no lives lost, and no homes and property burned," fire spokeswoman Lucie Bond said. "Firefighters have been going house-to-house to decrease the risk. We're simply not going to leave homes unprotected."

Elsewhere, in northern Utah, about 10 homes were destroyed when a wildfire raced through the community of Willow Springs late Friday. As of midday Saturday, the Patch Springs Fire had burned more than 50 square miles. It was 20 percent contained.

The Beaver Creek Fire is the nation's top-priority wildfire, in part because it's burning so close to homes and subdivisions. Early Saturday, the firefight was hampered by thick smoke that engulfed Hailey, a town with 7,900 inhabitants 14 miles south of Ketchum, home of the Sun Valley Ski Resort.


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